On Feedback

Random, Writing

I’m heading into the final stages of editing my overgrown story Firestorm, which means I’ve had someone read it and give feedback. This is an important process, I know. And it helps improve the final outcome, especially when one is self-publishing. Being a solitary writer can sometimes feel like shouting out into a vacuum, wondering if anyone will ever hear. At least that’s how it feels to me.

But this time the feedback made me realize it might be easier to go it alone sometimes. Wow. Made me feel like the shittiest writer ever, some of it, because I got the distinct impression that the reader wasn’t even reading my manuscript, but rather something completely different. Some of the comments had me going “Huh? What do you mean, being surprised by X? There was a whole friggin’ chapter about X earlier, how could it blindside you so bad?”

And yet, at the same time I want to forget all about other people’s opinions and just write for myself, I’m still happy I sent the sucker off to be picked on and misunderstood. Check it out. Every single time the person asked a clueless question, it pointed big shiny arrows at a flaw. Because if the area in question wasn’t boring or poorly written, then the person wouldn’t have asked questions about it. Right? Right. Plus, it made me think of something a friend said ages ago, about movie critics. Paraphrase: You don’t have to agree with the critic. If you know what they like or dislike, it can still give you a good idea if you’ll like the movie or not. So, and this is my interpretation now, if the critic hates lighthearted, silly space operas, but you love them, a bad review might be a nice indicator that you’ll love the movie. Especially if the critic rips on the character for wearing a spacesuit that looks like pajamas, but you love the cheesy pajama look on a bridge crew.

So I applied that manner of thinking to the feedback, and it helped a bit. What? You didn’t like that I left four millennia of history out of the action scene? I must have gotten the action right, ’cause I know you love slow, in-depth, detailed explorations of history. And you can’t figure out why a character would do something Not Nice? Awesome, I gave the character a flaw.

And yet, there’s that whole “shittiest writer ever” feeling… Argh. I’ll just keep telling myself it’s okay, the shittiest writer ever wouldn’t bother trying to find and fix the flaws.

 

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What’s a… FIRESTORM?

Promo, Writing

Hmm. A Firestorm. Well, a personal answer is that it was a musical suite, a seven minute long symphony I played in a long-ago honor band, written to express the horror felt by the composer when he thought about the Allied fire-bombing of Dresden in WWII. Not ’cause the composer was a Nazi sympathizer or anything crappy like that. He wrote it because of all the beautiful art, architecture, music, and history that got destroyed. The word Firestorm, and all the crazy sounds that were rolled into that tiny symphony, have stuck with me since high school.

Okay, none of you care about that, but that’s one answer to the question. The more important answer is that FIRESTORM is the title of the novel I’ve been working on forever now.

Anyone read Eternal? No? Okay, go read it now. I’ll wait a week for you to finish it.

[time passes]

Right. You’ve read it. Now we’re all on the same page. Firestorm is the sequel to Eternal. It takes up the story of Kai and Jericho a few years down the road, eight to be precise. And guess what? After working on this sucker since NaNoWriMo 2016, otherwise known as November, 2016, it’s in the final editing stage. I think I might have even committed myself to a release date. That’s 08/13/18, if you’re curious.

It’s coming. It’s coming soon.

And because I’m feeling moderately evil, I think I’ll put up the cover image. Only… it’s not the cover image. It’s just a teaser. Because I’m a moderately evil author, mwahahahahaha!

firestorm_pre