The Agony of dForce

3D

(For anyone who’s not immediately up on obscure references: check out the beginning of the Wide World of Sports from the ’70s. The title is a variation of “the agony of defeat.”)

Okay. So, a couple days ago, Daz Studio released the new version (4.10 if you’re interested). It includes a new feature, the dForce engine, which allows actual dynamic cloth right there inside Studio, without having to buy anything extra. And everyone’s been playing with it and posting their results, which has had me extra-bouncy and excited, waiting for the weekend. Aka today.

A little note here: I have terrible bad luck with dynamic fabric. Like, I don’t know if I’m terminally stupid or what, but I can almost never get the stuff to work right. So I started out with pretty low expectations.

And oh boy, did I ever meet them!

First, I set up a scene. Then I ran out of time, saved it for later, and went to work. That sucked.

Fast forward a bit to today. I forgot about my original scene and set up a new one. I made sure there wasn’t a bit of poke-through anywhere to be found. I made pretty hair, nice lights, good skin, the whole nine yards. See? This is what it all looked like before I pooched it.

1

Okay, doing good so far. I used that particular hair because a friend of mine from deviantArt said dForce works better on older hair models without loads of strands. Fine. No problem. I’ve always liked the Radiant Jaguar hair, it’s pretty.

So… add the dForce modifier. (Actually, spend a freakin’ long time looking for the damn thing, because as you can clearly see from the screenshot, my Studio looks different from anyone else’s on the entire planet. Found it, though. And if you’re looking for it too, right click the Simulation Settings tab.) Blithely assume it will work. Click “Simulate”.

And… freak out!

1.5

I forgot simulations start from the default pose. *blush* Oops. Thought I’d already screwed something up.

Which, of course, I did.

2

Yeah, that looks like shit. Right. On to the next thing. I’ll fix the hair later, time for the dress.

CRASH!

Yeah. Blew up my computer. Daz Studio and Photoshop both went kablooey.

Okay, fine, I don’t expect this dForce thing to work with every piece of clothing out there. So I pull up the other file, the one I started immediately after upgrading my Studio.

3

Crap. Forgot to give her a lantern. I get the scene all fixed up and ready to go, although I didn’t bother with any fancy materials or lighting. I add modifiers, make sure the dress will ignore the lantern, hit Simulate, and…

Not a crash, but still swear-worthy. Studio suddenly can’t locate any OpenCL device on my computer. I have one. I have a very nice one, in fact. But apparently it’s gone invisible.

Crap, crap, crap.

So I do the usual stuff. Restart, blah blah blah. I even updated my graphics driver. Why the hell not, never hurts, especially when you’re doing crazy 3D stuff.

Crash, crash, crashity crash crash!

Fine. You want to be a piece of crashing shit? I’ll fix you!

New scene. G8F, the clothes they sent out specifically for the dForce update. Boring. Mundane.

4

Hey, look at that, it’s doing it! Wow! It’s working! Even past the point where it crashed before.

5

Success! Too bad it’s a freakin’ boring, mundane, utterly uninteresting image. Bleah.

But I got it to work. So… back to the cool stuff.

6

Much more interesting outfit. And look at that, no crash yet!

7

I can see her butt.

CRASH!

Aw, hell. Here we go again. Finnegan, begin agin.

8

By the way, this is what the scene looks like before the sim runs.

And…

9

This is what it looks like after the sim runs. *sigh*

I guess I really need to spend some time with this thing, figure out what exactly is making it blow up. But for now, no more. I’m in the middle of an Elder Scrolls experiment, and must go play Skyrim.

If you’re curious, the experiment is this: Can I determine which game is better, Oblivion or Skyrim? To test whether this question is answerable, I started new characters in both games. So far I’ve completed the main quest in each, built a nice home in each, and am about to embark on the mage guild/college quests. And guess what? I ain’t got an answer. I love ’em both!

Advertisements

Volumetric Rays

3D

I ran across a post on deviantArt the other day, asking how to produce volumetric effects using the AtmoCam for Iray. That got me wondering why the hell I’d never done that myself, since I adore volumetric effects in all their forms. So I made an image of a big kitty laying in the light and shadows, and then explained what I did for the person with the question.

And then, like a doofus, I didn’t bother to do anything else with the information… at first. It took a couple hours, but I finally remembered I have a blog, and on this blog I sometimes post 3D stuff. So here it is, the image and the way I lit it, just in case anyone else out there is wondering how to get light rays in Daz Studio with the AtmoCam.

What I used:

Daz Studio 4.9

AtmoCam for Iray

Daz Big Cat 2

Sun Hall

iRadiance Light Probe Expansion 2

Iray Ghost Light Kit

What I did:

(no, this is not the only way to do this stuff. This is just the process I used to get this result.)

I set the Atmo Cam to “SunRise” and “MedHeavy.” I also used one of the iRadiance Light Probes and set the draw dome control to “off.” The HDRI happened to make two visible bright blobs that worked for suns. Then I took a spotlight, dragged it out beyond the mountains, and positioned it so it looked like it was coming from one of the HDRI light blobs, the larger one. I set the temperature to 10000K (super bright white) and the luminous flux to 10000000000.0. Yes, I know that’s an insane number, but that’s what got the sunlight effect. I tried a distant light, but it never did produce any kind of rays. The spotlight could be focused a bit, I put the spread angle at 90 and that kept the light where I wanted it. I also added a big, weak Ghost Light because the shadows were too thick around the throne area. I rendered in Iray with spectral rendering and caustics turned on, but I don’t think that affected anything. Sun Hall doesn’t have glass in the windows.

So, there you go. That’s one way to get a decent volumetric effect. (And yes, before anyone mentions it, I know the image is noisy in the shadowed areas. It was an experiment, not an attempt at perfection.)